Citizenship and Naturalization

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Citizenship and Naturalization

SHOULD I APPLY?

CITIZENSHIP AND NATURALIZATION

There are different ways to obtain U.S. citizenship. Naturalization is the way that a noncitizen voluntarily becomes a United States Citizen (USC).  Depending on your situation, you may be eligible to apply for citizenship if you meet specific requirements. People eligible for citizen ship include:

1. Lawful Permanent Residents (LPR) of at least 5 years (the most common);

2. Lawful Permanent Residents who have been married to a USC for at least 3 years;

3. U.S. Military Service members; and

a. Spouse and children of U.S. military service member

4. Children of USCs

When you are considering whether to apply for U.S. citizenship, it is important to first determine if you are already a USC. Some people may have acquired citizenship through their parents or grandparents and not even know it! If that is the case would only need to apply to receive certification of you U.S. citizenship by filing an N-600. (discussed below)

If you, you are not already an USC, then you would need to assess whether you are eligible to become a USC through any of the 4 categories listed about. When assessing your eligibility, it is important to consider criminal history as it may impact your eligibility to apply or how you should apply. If you have a criminal history, it is recommended to consult with an immigration attorney before filing your application.

If you are eligible, you would file an N-400 application and pay your fees. Some applicants will be required to attend a biometrics appointment for USCIS to verify and catalog their identity – by taking your photo, fingerprints, signature, etc. This information can be used for creating your identity cards and for criminal background checks.

Once all of the preliminary processing is completed on your case, with the exception of some applicants, USCIS will send and appointment notice scheduling your naturalization interview for you to complete the naturalization process. Click here to find study materials and resources to prepare for the naturalization interview and test.  When you show up to your interview you should bring your appointment notice and be well prepared for the citizenship test. Often at interviews, the immigration officer will verbally inform the applicant of their intent to grant, continue, or deny their application but USCIS will mail notice of the decision to you.

If your application is approved, USCIS will mail you notice of your naturalization ceremony where you will take the Oath of Allegiance and be sworn in as an USC. Some lucky applicants may have the option to be sworn in on the same day as their interview if a naturalization ceremony is on the same day as the interview.

There are different ways to obtain U.S. citizenship. Naturalization is the way that a noncitizen voluntarily becomes a United States Citizen (USC).  Depending on your situation, you may be eligible to apply for citizenship if you meet specific requirements. People eligible for citizen ship include:

1. Lawful Permanent Residents (LPR) of at least 5 years (the most common);

2. Lawful Permanent Residents who have been married to a USC for at least 3 years;

3. U.S. Military Service members; and

a. Spouse and children of U.S. military service member

4. Children of USCs

When you are considering whether to apply for U.S. citizenship, it is important to first determine if you are already a USC. Some people may have acquired citizenship through their parents or grandparents and not even know it! If that is the case would only need to apply to receive certification of you U.S. citizenship by filing an N-600. (discussed below)

If you, you are not already an USC, then you would need to assess whether you are eligible to become a USC through any of the 4 categories listed about. When assessing your eligibility, it is important to consider criminal history as it may impact your eligibility to apply or how you should apply. If you have a criminal history, it is recommended to consult with an immigration attorney before filing your application.

If you are eligible, you would file an N-400 application and pay your fees. Some applicants will be required to attend a biometrics appointment for USCIS to verify and catalog their identity – by taking your photo, fingerprints, signature, etc. This information can be used for creating your identity cards and for criminal background checks.

Once all of the preliminary processing is completed on your case, with the exception of some applicants, USCIS will send and appointment notice scheduling your naturalization interview for you to complete the naturalization process. Click here to find study materials and resources to prepare for the naturalization interview and test.  When you show up to your interview you should bring your appointment notice and be well prepared for the citizenship test. Often at interviews, the immigration officer will verbally inform the applicant of their intent to grant, continue, or deny their application but USCIS will mail notice of the decision to you.

If your application is approved, USCIS will mail you notice of your naturalization ceremony where you will take the Oath of Allegiance and be sworn in as an USC. Some lucky applicants may have the option to be sworn in on the same day as their interview if a naturalization ceremony is on the same day as the interview.

Certification of Citizenship

U.S. citizen parents convey citizenship to children born outside of the United States. Generally, you may obtain citizenship through your U.S. citizen parents when you are born, or after your birth but before you turn 18. Important factors to consider when determining your eligibility are:

· Your date of birth;

· The citizenship and marital status of your parents;

· Your parents’ physical presence and residence in the United States before your child’s birth

· Whether you were born in or out of wedlock;

· Whether you were legitimated by the parent under the applicable laws; and

· Whether you were legally adopted.

These factors have restrictions and be complex to understand. It is recommended to consult with an immigration attorney before you apply if you have any doubts. If you believe you are eligible, you must file your N-600 and pay the fees. You will receive a receipt notice confirming that USCIS received your application. If you are not within any of the age and disability exceptions for biometrics appointments, your biometrics appointment date, time and the location of your application support center will be on your receipt notice. USCIS may send you a notice to appear for an interview. Finally, you will receive notice of your decision.

LEARN MORE

Not sure if you are eligible to apply for a certain immigration benefit? Here you can find general information on who can apply, how to apply and what you can expect to happen in the application process. If you still have questions of whether you would be a good applicant and would like to schedule a low cost consultation or have an attorney review your self-prepared application before you file it,  click on the link below and schedule your consultation today.

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My Immigration Law Case PLLC

539 West Commerce St #3839, Dallas, TX, 75208, US